workplace safety

BRIAN SEIFFERLEIN / HARVEST PUBLIC MEDIA

Getting burgers and wings to your plate is a dangerous business. Federal regulators and meat companies agree there’s more work to do to make the slaughterhouse safe. And while there are signs the industry is stepping up its efforts, danger remains. In the final part of our series Dangerous Jobs, Cheap Meat, Harvest Public Media’s Grant Gerlock explains why.

BRIAN SEIFFERLEIN / HARVEST PUBLIC MEDIA

The average American eats 200 pounds of meat every year – it's one of the highest consumption rates in the world. That high demand for chicken, beef and pork drives fast-paced production rates in meatpacking plants, and workers often pay the price. In the second part of Harvest Public Media’s series, “Dangerous Jobs, Cheap Meat,” Peggy Lowe reports on life after working on “the chain.”

DAN BOYCE / ROCKY MOUNTAIN PBS FOR HARVEST PUBLIC MEDIA

Hundreds of thousands of people go to work each day preparing the beef, pork and poultry that ends up on our dinner tables. Their workplace is among the most hazardous in the country.

Slaughterhouses, while safer than they were decades ago, exact a steep price from workers--sometimes, even their lives. In the first part of the series Dangerous Jobs, Cheap Meat, Harvest Public Media’s Luke Runyon takes a look at one tragic case in Colorado.

Brian Seifferlein / Harvest Public Media

A slaughterhouse is a safer place to work than it used to be, according to a government report. But it’s still dangerous work, and not all injuries are being counted

Injury rates in the meatpacking industry got better over the last decade but are probably worse than the data suggests. That’s the conclusion of a study from the Government Accountability Office.

The GAO says incidents at meat and poultry plants are underreported by workers who are afraid to lose their jobs, and by medical staff who send people back to work even when they’re hurt.

According to a new report from the American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations, Kansas is a dangerous place to work when compared with most other states.

The report, "Death on the Job: The Toll of Neglect," ranks Kansas 40th out of the 50 states based on the rate of workplace fatalities in 2011.